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Saturday, 3 November 2012 Switzerland: Pupil Bullied Out of School by Classmates Because he Refused to Convert to Islam 13:56 | Posted by Cheradenine Zakalwe Peter is a quiet, unremarkable school pupil. The sixth year pupil enjoys going to school, but for some time a classmate has been making his life in a Winterthur primary school difficult. This is not a matter of the usual teasing, but is, above, a question of religion. Ali (name changed) wants to convince Peter of his religious ideas and convert him to Islam. The teacher’s attempts to intervene remain without success, resulting in the sensitive Peter showing psychosomatic reactions.

In the 1st class Peter and Ali get on very well. It was not important that 14 of the 19 school pupils had a Muslim background. But later Ali, whose father is a Muslim priest, to give Peter religious instruction. If he was a Muslim, they could be friends, said Ali, whose zeal became ever more marked as time went on.

Ali made fun of Christianity. How is it possible that Jesus is the son of God, asked Ali maliciously. As the class visited a mosque during religious instruction, Ali demanded that Peter now pray to Allah. One day Ali gave his classmates a religious pamphlet of the German convert and hate preacher Pierre Vogel, who is banned from travelling to Switzerland.

Now Peter had the courage to tell the whole class that he wasn’t going to let himself be converted to Islam. Ali’s answer: “You are possessed by the devil”. Afterwards other Muslim classmates also turned away from Peter. The conflict climaxed in two classmates holding Peter while Ali threw ping pong balls at him, continually shouting: “Die!”

Peter suffered ever more often from headaches and stomach pains and developed anxiety disorders. For that reason his mother took him out of the school and taught him herself. As a teacher, she was able to do this.

For several months now, Peter has been receiving therapeutic treatment. His psychiatrist confirms that the psychosomatic symptoms were caused by “fear of classmates”. “Because of the adaptation disorder with anxiety and depressive reactions, Peter is currently seriously impaired in his personal and educational development,” writes the doctor in an expert opinion. “In the last three years similar reactions to school attendance were seen based on conflicts that were mostly caused by the sociocultural differences in Peter’s class.”

…It is undisputed however that, because of immigration and the mixing of cultures, religious topics are being discussed ever more often and can lead to tensions, as various teachers confirmed in interview.

TA is aware of another case in which a Muslim school pupil, whose female classmates wore short skirts and close-fitting T-shirts, delivered an ultimatum to them to dress more modestly.

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Switzerland: Girls Banned from Sports Ground Next to Mosque Because of Harassment from Muslims 12:24 | Posted by Cheradenine Zakalwe
Last month a gymnastics teacher at the André-Chavanne school [in Geneva] prevented her pupils from participating in a gymnastics lesson on the athletics field. The reason? The stadium is close to the mosque of Petit-Saconnex and three years ago, female students in their gym kit were insulted by worshippers. The explanations shocked parents.

"I find it unacceptable that my 16-year-old daughter cannot run in gym kit on the pretext that the mosque is close to the school playing field!", the father of one 16-year-old pupil said angrily.

But let us go back to that Friday at the start of October, the day of prayer. The daughters insisted on running outside, like the boys. To justify her refusal, the teacher recalled that in 2009, a class of girls, who also went out on Friday, had been insulted... The worshippers had even thrown soft drinks cans at them. An incident that sparked a strong reaction from both the Department of Public Education and the mosque. The mosque officials apologised and then promised to do everything so that such incidents did not reoccur. The Department refrained from filing a legal complaint.

...For Hafid Ouardiri, former spokesman of the mosque, the reaction of the teacher was wise: "We live in a plural society where it is important to respect what each person wants to express. In deciding not to have young girls in shorts running in front of the mosque, I think the teacher took a considered decision. "I think it's better that a possible problem is anticipated which could have been seen as a provocation". However the mediator also insists on reminding the mosque worshippers that they should not dictate how the westerns should live their lives: "It is important to respect the worldviews of other people. It is also important that the worshippers know that there is a school and a playing field close to the mosque, and that they must respect the student's living space, whether or not they are wearing gym clothes. They must not be offended by it." And Hafid Ouardiri concludes: "Wouldn't the best solution be to plant trees or a thick green hedge to create shade between the mosque and the playing field?"

 November 10, 2012
German School Pupils Now Regularly Receive “Birthday Beatings” From Muslim Classmates 18:08 | Posted by Cheradenine Zakalwe Instead of congratulations and gifts there were bruises to the face and arms: A Neukölln school pupil was so badly beaten by his schoolmates on his birthday that he required outpatient treatment in a hospital. The case, which emerged around two weeks ago, throws a spotlight on the phenomenon of “birthday beatings”, which, although it has spread across the whole country, rarely reaches public notice.

…The director of the Criminological Institute of Lower Saxony, Christian Pfeiffer, has many years of experience with “birthday beatings”. When he was still Justice Minister in Hannover in 2002, young assailants at a school in Stadthagen had systematically and repeatedly tyrannised their schoolmate on his birthday. Pfeiffer’s institute has now examined the ritual and determined that it is motivated by envy. “From envy and irritation develop a wish to put the other down,” explains the criminologist. Mostly it goes no further than mobbing, more rarely a beating. Occasionally, birthday beatings were considered “part of the school culture”, as was the case that time in Stadthagen.

According to Pfeiffer, part of the explanation may be that in Muslim families, it is not the tradition for birthdays to be celebrated so lavishly and with many gifts as is typically the case in Germany. When individual school pupils then get new smartphones or computers on their birthday, the Muslim children, who didn’t receive anything, may feel provoked. A pupils’ representative from a Berlin school confirmed this explanation from his own experience, but did not want to be named in connection with the matter.


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